Course1

Live Replay: Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 1

$59.00

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/9/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Live Replay: Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

$59.00

  Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements.   Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation   Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/10/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: 2021 Uniform Commercial Code/Commercial Law Update

$59.00

The overlapping articles of the UCC impact most business, commercial and real estate transactions.  From the perfection of security interests to the enforceability of promissory notes and investment contracts to equipment leases and the sale of goods, the UCC plays a role in most significant transactions. This program, led by one of the nation’s leading authorities on the UCC, will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of developments under the many articles of the UCC, including secured transactions, investment notes, sales, and equipment leasing. Recent UCC developments for transactional attorneys Developments impacting commercial, business and real estate transactions UCC Article 9, asset-based transactions and secured transactions Sales of goods contracts Equipment leases, including computer equipment and capital equipment Notes, guarantees and letters of credit   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/2/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Incentive Compensation in Businesses, Part 1

$59.00

Companies of every type including incentivize compensation features in employee compensation packages. The range of incentive compensation tools and techniques available to these companies depends on the type of entity involved.  Corporate entities have stock options, restricted stock and other forms of profit or capital appreciation rights.  LLCs are even more flexible and can award a variety of forms of profit or capital rights.  These alternatives, together with voting and vesting restrictions, provide companies alternatives for virtually every circumstance.  But each alternative comes with tradeoffs – practical, tax and financial. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the incentive compensation alternatives in business entities.   Day 1: Framework of incentive compensation alternatives for corporate v. pass-through entity Advantages and drawbacks of stock options, restricted stock, and profit participation rights How IRC Section 83 impacts corporate stock options, the award of restricted stock and other rights Use of vesting to impact the tax consequences of incentive compensation Special incentive compensation issues in S Corps   Day 2: Use of profit interests and capital interest in LLCs, partnerships Exchanging incentive compensation for services Incentive compensation in single member LLCs Impact of IRC Section 409A and deferred compensation Employment tax considerations   Speaker: Norman Lencz is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on a broad range of federal, state, local and international tax matters.  He advises clients on tax issues relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs, joint ventures and real estate transactions.  He also has extensive experience with compensation planning in closely held businesses.  Mr. Lencz earned his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his J.D. from Columbia University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/3/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Incentive Compensation in Businesses, Part 2

$59.00

  Companies of every type including incentivize compensation features in employee compensation packages. The range of incentive compensation tools and techniques available to these companies depends on the type of entity involved.  Corporate entities have stock options, restricted stock and other forms of profit or capital appreciation rights.  LLCs are even more flexible and can award a variety of forms of profit or capital rights.  These alternatives, together with voting and vesting restrictions, provide companies alternatives for virtually every circumstance.  But each alternative comes with tradeoffs – practical, tax and financial. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the incentive compensation alternatives in business entities.   Day 1: Framework of incentive compensation alternatives for corporate v. pass-through entity Advantages and drawbacks of stock options, restricted stock, and profit participation rights How IRC Section 83 impacts corporate stock options, the award of restricted stock and other rights Use of vesting to impact the tax consequences of incentive compensation Special incentive compensation issues in S Corps   Day 2: Use of profit interests and capital interest in LLCs, partnerships Exchanging incentive compensation for services Incentive compensation in single member LLCs Impact of IRC Section 409A and deferred compensation Employment tax considerations   Speaker: Norman Lencz is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on a broad range of federal, state, local and international tax matters.  He advises clients on tax issues relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs, joint ventures and real estate transactions.  He also has extensive experience with compensation planning in closely held businesses.  Mr. Lencz earned his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his J.D. from Columbia University School of Law.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/4/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics and Texting

$59.00

Text messaging has become a mainstream form of communication.  Clients now routinely text their lawyers about pending matters.  They may ask about the status of a case, provide facts about a case, communicate decisions to a lawyer, or message other sensitive information.  These messages are often to a lawyer’s mobile phone that is used extensively for personal purposes, unsecured in their transmissions, and easily accessible by third parties. This new wave of lawyer-client communication raises many difficult ethical questions, including preservation of the attorney-client privilege.   This program will provide you with a guide to the major ethics issues when lawyers and their clients text message about pending matters.   Confidentiality issues involving unsecured transmission of texts involving sensitive case issues How to handle mobile phones used for both personal purposes and law practice Potential loss of the attorney-client privilege when text messages are accessible by third parties Tension among the duties of competence, prudence and to communicate with clients Understanding the ethical risks and counseling clients about the risks to their case when texting   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/5/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning Issues in Divorce

$59.00

Martial separation and divorce are times fraught with emotion, but also fraught with financial decisions that have a major estate, trust and tax implications.  Transfers pursuant to divorce are generally tax-deferred.  But there are many complications, including the transfer of property over time or where the value may not be known, the assumption of debts, the treatment of income held in trust, and also complex issues of beneficiary designations in retirement plans and insurance contracts. If not properly planned, these transfers can have substantially adverse and often unanticipated consequences.  Thus program will cover major issues in trust and estate planning for divorce.   Treatment of income from and property held in trust on divorce Traps surrounding beneficiary designations on retirement benefits and insurance contracts Opportunities for post-nuptial agreements to resolve lingering disputes Issues related to the sale or transfer of personal residences Income tax issues when property and debt are separated in divorce Health care issues for children, including insurance for the divorcing spouse Educational expenses for children over time   Speakers: Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/6/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Trust & Estate Planning for Cabins, Boats, and Other Family Recreational Assets

$59.00

Clients frequently have substantial reactional assets that they want to pass in their estates – family cabins, mountain houses, other retreats, boats, and other assets.  These assets may be held in full or in fractional interests, sometimes shared uncomfortably by different parts of a single family or with third parties, giving rise to issues of control, value, and transfer.  Any or all of these assets may have substantial financial value and almost always have emotional value to clients. Planning for these assets is a blend of property and tax law, but also practical counseling of clients. This program will provide you with a real world guide to trust and estate planning for recreational assets.    How to title and/or hold assets in LLCs or other business entities Methods and agreements foster stable and cooperative use property among many family members Special trust and estate planning issues for reactional assets Use of Qualified Personal Residence Trusts for cabins and other vacation homes Real estate issues – capital improvements, treatment of taxes and expenses, conservation easements Special issues related to boats and airplanes   Speakers: Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer a partner in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/11/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Techniques to Avoid and Resolve Deadlocks in Closely Held Companies

$59.00

One of the biggest risks to a closely held company is a dispute among the members of its ownership group. The members may disagree about a major company transaction, the strategic direction of the company, distribution practices, or simply develop ruinous inter-personal issues.  In closely held companies that are held by a single family, disputes are particularly personal, often arising when members of a junior generation succeed to the interests and leadership role of the senior generation.  Unless these disputes are carefully channeled into dispute resolution mechanisms, the stability and financial success of the company is threatened.  This program will provide you with a guide to the sources of disputes in closely held companies and mechanisms for resolution, with an emphasis using buy/sell agreements to resolve disputes.   Common sources of disputes and deadlocks in closely-held companies Planning and drafting mechanisms to resolve disputes Conflicts over strategic transactions, distributions, or inter-personal relations Practical use of buy/sell agreements to liquidate interest of dissenting member Major elements of buy/sell agreements Alternatives to using buy/sell agreements   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/12/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Settlement Agreements in Civil Litigation

$59.00

A settlement in litigation is only as good as the settlement agreement.  The case may have stopped short of trial or stopped in the middle of trial as the parties realized that settlement was the best course of action, but preserving the informal agreement to settle places immense pressure on getting the underlying agreement right – not only settling the present dispute but preserving the settlement as things change over time. Understanding the law governing these agreements and carefully drafting their essential provisions – mutual releases, scope, financial terms, non-disclosure, non-disparagement– are essential to preserving the value of the settlement. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the essential provisions, traps and opportunities of litigation settlement agreements.   Framework of law governing settlement agreements Essential provisions of settlement agreements, including traps for the unwary Defining scope of settlement and mutual releases – either to prevent resumption of litigation or leave related litigation untouched Role of non-disclosure and non-disparagement provisions, violations and remedies. Enhancing the enforceability and decreasing the costs of settlement agreements   Speaker: Steven B. Malech is partner in the New York City office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where he is chair of the firm’s probate litigation practice group.  He is represents beneficiaries, fiduciaries and creditors in disputes involving alleged violations of the Prudent Investor Act and its predecessors, alleged breaches of fiduciary duty, disputed accountings, and will contests. He represents clients in cutting edge probate litigation matters involving trusts and estates with assets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Malech received his B.A., with special honors, from the University of Texas and his J.D. from the Connecticut School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/16/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Getting to Market: Sales and Distribution Agreements

$59.00

A product is only as successful as its distribution, only as profitable as it reaches the widest market possible.  Most suppliers of goods rely on distributors to reach the market. Distributor agreements can come in a multitude of types, including wholesale and retail distribution agreements. These agreements encompass a series of intricately interrelated provisions about the scope of products, the scope of the territory involved, exclusivity, pricing control, support in the form of marketing and training, supply guarantees, and much more.  Success for both the supplier and the distributor depends on a thoughtfully planned and drafted agreement.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most essential provisions of distributor agreements.   Understanding distributor and supplier objectives – and how they can be harmonized Legal framework of distributor agreements Products covered and how they are defined and altered over time Exclusivity – territory and products Support – training, advertising, promotion Supply guarantees, timeliness of performance Pricing – who controls and antitrust considerations   Speaker: Joel R. Buckberg is a partner in Nashville office of Baker Donelson, P.C. and vice chair of the firm’s corporate group. He has more than 40 years’ experience in corporate and business transactions.  His practice focuses on corporate and asset transactions and operations, particularly in hospitality, franchising and distribution.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. from Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/17/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Easements in Real Estate

$59.00

Easements are nonpossessory rights to use a third party’s property.  They can be conveyed by deed or contract and may have a significant impact on the underlying property. When valid and enforceable, easements may have a major impact on the use of property, its development and ultimately the value of the underlying property. It isvery important to timely identify easements in diligence, value them, and perhaps obtain their termination or release. If your client depends on an easement, ensuring that they are properly drafted and filed, and are enforceable are essential.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to easements in real estate transactions, including their types, how they are created and released, or enforced in transactions.   Types of easements – prescriptive, appurtenant, in gross, mortgage-related, estoppel, necessity and quasi-easements How they are used in real estate transactions – which are best for your client? Due diligence in transactions – identifying and valuing easements Creation of easements – drafting essential terms and filing for maximum enforcement Enforcement – methods and measure of damages Termination and release – effective drafting to eliminate easements   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/18/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: 2021 Ethics Update, Part 1

$59.00

This annual ethics program will provide you with a round-table discussion of practical ethical issues important to your practice. The program will provide you with an engaging discussion of ethics developments involving technology and law practice, conflicts of interest, and ethics in co-counsel and referral relationships. The panel will also discuss highly sensitive issues when lawyers learn that their clients are engaged in misconduct – what do you do and when?This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of practical ethics developments important to your practice.   Day 1: Ethics of co-counsel relationships: Are you your brother’s keeper? Ethics and client misconduct: What to do? Developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Technology and law practice: annual potpourri update Developments in confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for 20 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. and past chair of the ABA Business Law Section Committee on Professional Responsibility.  He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/19/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: 2021 Ethics Update, Part 2

$59.00

This annual ethics program will provide you with a round-table discussion of practical ethical issues important to your practice. The program will provide you with an engaging discussion of ethics developments involving technology and law practice, conflicts of interest, and ethics in co-counsel and referral relationships. The panel will also discuss highly sensitive issues when lawyers learn that their clients are engaged in misconduct – what do you do and when?This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of practical ethics developments important to your practice.   Day 1: Ethics of co-counsel relationships: Are you your brother’s keeper? Ethics and client misconduct: What to do? Developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Technology and law practice: annual potpourri update Developments in confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for 20 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. and past chair of the ABA Business Law Section Committee on Professional Responsibility.  He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/20/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Assuming Liabilities/Debt in Transactions: Tricks and Traps

$59.00

This program will provide you a practical guide to drafting for the assumption and limitation of liabilities in business and commercial transactions.  The program will cover the mechanics of assuming debt in a transaction, how it is identified, terms negotiated and documented. The program will discuss the related issue of how “bad conduct” carve-outs in indemnification and other limitation of liability provisions can defeat limitations on liability if the carve-outs are not carefully drafted.  Successor liability in business transactions and techniques to mitigate its risk will be covered. This program will provide a real-world guide to handling debt and liabilities in transactions.   Identifying and documenting the assumption of liabilities Successor liability and techniques to mitigate the risk “Bad conduct” carve-outs in indemnification and limitation of liability Risks of carve-out language being over-expansive and defeating liability protection Mistakes in the treatment of liabilities in transactions   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/24/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Business Divorce, Part 1

$59.00

  Business divorce can be as complicated, costly and dramatic as traditional divorce. When owners of a closely-held company decide they cannot or will not work together anymore, there are several alternatives for achieving the separation – a division of assets among the owners, a buyout of one owner or several owners by a third party or by the company itself, or a complete or partial sale of the company.  But these and other transactional forms come with risk – the risk that dividing the assets of an operating business will cause substantial destruction of value to the company or that strife will take its toll on operations and employees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the alternatives for achieving a business divorce, planning the process, containing the risk and preserving value. Day 1: Overview of techniques to accomplish a divorce – buy-sell arrangements, redemptions, compensation, employment separation and retirement plan techniques Special considerations when the divorce involves LLCs, S Corps or partnerships Valuation methods and disputes in a business divorce Techniques for financing a buyout as part of a business divorce Minimizing adverse tax consequences in a business divorce   Day 2: Compensation and retirement plan-based techniques for accomplishing a business divorce Special issues when a business divorce involves a distressed business Role of confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation agreements as part of the divorce Important intellectual property issues, including customer lists, goodwill and trade secrets Preservation of valuable tax attributes   Speakers:    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/25/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Business Divorce, Part 2

$59.00

Business divorce can be as complicated, costly and dramatic as traditional divorce. When owners of a closely-held company decide they cannot or will not work together anymore, there are several alternatives for achieving the separation – a division of assets among the owners, a buyout of one owner or several owners by a third party or by the company itself, or a complete or partial sale of the company.  But these and other transactional forms come with risk – the risk that dividing the assets of an operating business will cause substantial destruction of value to the company or that strife will take its toll on operations and employees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the alternatives for achieving a business divorce, planning the process, containing the risk and preserving value. Day 1: Overview of techniques to accomplish a divorce – buy-sell arrangements, redemptions, compensation, employment separation and retirement plan techniques Special considerations when the divorce involves LLCs, S Corps or partnerships Valuation methods and disputes in a business divorce Techniques for financing a buyout as part of a business divorce Minimizing adverse tax consequences in a business divorce   Day 2: Compensation and retirement plan-based techniques for accomplishing a business divorce Special issues when a business divorce involves a distressed business Role of confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation agreements as part of the divorce Important intellectual property issues, including customer lists, goodwill and trade secrets Preservation of valuable tax attributes   Speakers:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/26/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: The Ethics of Supervising Other Lawyers

$59.00

Lawyers are not only responsible for their own ethical conduct and decision making but also for the ethical practice of lawyers they supervise.  Whether it’s a partner supervising the work of an associate or the lead lawyer on a case supervising a group of partners and associates, the supervising lawyer has responsibilities to ensure that the lawyers he or she is supervising are ethically compliant. When subordinate lawyers violate ethics rules, supervising lawyers are potentially liable for that misconduct. This program will provide you with a guide to ethical issues when lawyers supervise other lawyers and non-lawyer support staff.   Standards for ensuring compliance by subordinate attorneys and potential liability when they act improperly Lawyer supervision of paralegals and other non-lawyer staff Responsibilities of subordinate lawyers who rely on judgment of supervising lawyers Special issues involved in billing the work of subordinate and co-counsel attorneys, and paralegals In-house counsel of outside counsel   Speaker: Matthew Corbin is Senior Vice President and Executive Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services, where he consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.  Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he was a trial and appellate lawyer handling professional liability, commercial, business tort, employment, construction, insurance, and regulatory matters. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Mary Briscoe of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  Mr. Corbin earned his B.A. from the University of Kansas and his J.D. from the University of Kansas School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/27/2021
    Presented
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Trust and Estate Planning for Firearms

$59.00

Many clients hold firearms in their estates.  These firearms – shotguns, rifles, pistols or others guns – may have been long held in their families and hold sentimental value. These firearms may also be quite valuable. Clients wanting to pass these firearms to their heirs, however, are subject to a significant and growing body of law regulating the transfer of firearms, even as part of a testate transfer. These are no ordinary assets that can be transferred easily like other personal property. In fact, in the absence of strict adherence to a body of law, the estate’s executor, a trust’s trustee, or the estate planner himself or herself, as well as the transferee, may be subject to substantial fines or even imprisonment.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to risks of and best practices for transferring firearms as part of a trust and estate plan.   Framework of gun law and how it impacts trust and estate planning Drafting “Gun Trusts” to transfer firearms & comply with National Firearm Act Planning for death and incapacity of firearm owners Potential substantial fines and jail time for estate planners, executors, and trustees Special issues in probate, trustee selection, and constructive control of firearms   Speaker: Lee-ford Tritt is a law professor and member of the graduate tax faculty at the University of Florida College of Law in Gainesville, where he teaches trust and estate planning. He is also the director of the Center for Estate Planning and director of the Estate Planning Practice Certificate Program.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel and the vice president of the American Association of Law Schools’ Trusts & Estates Division.  In addition, He serves as vice chair of the ABA Real Property Trusts & Estates Law Section’s Outreach Committee as well as a chair of a committee for the Non-Tax Estate Planning Considerations Group.  Before joining the College of Law, he practiced at Davis, Polk & Wardwell and Milbank Tweed in New York City.  Professor Tritt earned his B.A. from the University of the South, his J.D. from New York University School of Law, and his LL.M. in taxation from the New York University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/31/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2021 Ethics Update, Part 1

$59.00

This annual ethics program will provide you with a round-table discussion of practical ethical issues important to your practice. The program will provide you with an engaging discussion of ethics developments involving technology and law practice, conflicts of interest, and ethics in co-counsel and referral relationships. The panel will also discuss highly sensitive issues when lawyers learn that their clients are engaged in misconduct – what do you do and when?This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of practical ethics developments important to your practice.   Day 1: Ethics of co-counsel relationships: Are you your brother’s keeper? Ethics and client misconduct: What to do? Developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Technology and law practice: annual potpourri update Developments in confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for 20 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. and past chair of the ABA Business Law Section Committee on Professional Responsibility.  He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/1/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2021 Ethics Update, Part 2

$59.00

This annual ethics program will provide you with a round-table discussion of practical ethical issues important to your practice. The program will provide you with an engaging discussion of ethics developments involving technology and law practice, conflicts of interest, and ethics in co-counsel and referral relationships. The panel will also discuss highly sensitive issues when lawyers learn that their clients are engaged in misconduct – what do you do and when?This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of practical ethics developments important to your practice.   Day 1: Ethics of co-counsel relationships: Are you your brother’s keeper? Ethics and client misconduct: What to do? Developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Technology and law practice: annual potpourri update Developments in confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for 20 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. and past chair of the ABA Business Law Section Committee on Professional Responsibility.  He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/2/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Percentage Rent Leases in Commercial Real Estate

$59.00

Percentage rent is used in retail leases where the landlord has bargaining power to demand a share of the tenant’s economic gains.  Demand for retail space may be high or a landlord’s specific location may be particularly attractive such that the tenant is willing to pay not only a fixed amount of rent but a share of its gross revenue.  These types of leases require a sophisticated understanding of the underlying economics of tenant’s business. These leases also require very careful drafting. How is gross revenue defined?  Is there a minimum amount or a maximum amount?  How are these numbers verified?  And what are all the related protections for the landlord or the tenant?  This program will provide you with a practical guide to negotiating and drafting percentage leases. Circumstances where percentage rent is commonly seen Economics of percentage rent – landlord and tenant perspectives Defining key terms – “gross sales,” exclusions, percent of rent Determining thresholds – minimum rent, sliding scales Financial reporting and audit rights Important related provisions – non-competition, continuous use, payment terms   Speakers: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law. Richard R. Goldberg is a retired partner, resident in the Philadelphia office of Ballard Spahr, LLP, where he established an extensive real estate practice, including development, financing, leasing, and acquisition.  Earlier in his career, he served as vice president and associate general counsel of The Rouse Company for 23 years.  He is past president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, past chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute, and past chair of the International Council of Shopping Centers Law Conference.  Mr. Goldberg is currently a Fellow of the American College of Mortgage Attorneys and is a member of the American Law Institute.  Mr. Goldberg received his B.A. from Pennsylvania State University and his LL.B. from the University of Maryland School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/3/2021
    Presented
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Buying Time: Options Contracts in Real Estate

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/7/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Closely Held Company Merger & Acquisitions, Part 1

$59.00

  Mergers or buyouts of closely held companies are a complex, multifaceted process.  Agreeing on a valuation can be very difficult because there is no regular market of buyers and sellers and information on comparable sales is scarce. Closely held companies are typically structured to benefit a few shareholders, often members of a family, and require their financial statements and distributions to be normalized. There can also be substantial issues of liability, including successor liability in asset deals, requiring carefully crafted reps and warranties. Confidentiality is often essential in these transactions as sellers try not to unsettle existing commercial relationships and employees. This program will provide you with a practical guide to major planning and drafting considerations in the mergers and buyouts of closely held companies. Day 1: Confidentiality considerations in the sale and negotiation process Due diligence – financial, operational and workforce red flags Stock v. asset transactions and forms of consideration – cash v. equity Valuation of closely held companies in an illiquid market Use or of “earnouts” to bridge the gap in valuation   Day 2 : Reps, warranties, indemnity and basket issues common to closely held companies Successor liability concerns where assets are transferred Asset transfer issues – intangible assets, including intellectual property Transition issues – management, employees, business relationship, contract issues Escrow and post-closing issues   Speakers: Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware.   Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/8/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Closely Held Company Merger & Acquisitions, Part 2

$59.00

Mergers or buyouts of closely held companies are a complex, multifaceted process.  Agreeing on a valuation can be very difficult because there is no regular market of buyers and sellers and information on comparable sales is scarce. Closely held companies are typically structured to benefit a few shareholders, often members of a family, and require their financial statements and distributions to be normalized. There can also be substantial issues of liability, including successor liability in asset deals, requiring carefully crafted reps and warranties. Confidentiality is often essential in these transactions as sellers try not to unsettle existing commercial relationships and employees. This program will provide you with a practical guide to major planning and drafting considerations in the mergers and buyouts of closely held companies. Day 1: Confidentiality considerations in the sale and negotiation process Due diligence – financial, operational and workforce red flags Stock v. asset transactions and forms of consideration – cash v. equity Valuation of closely held companies in an illiquid market Use or of “earnouts” to bridge the gap in valuation   Day 2: Reps, warranties, indemnity and basket issues common to closely held companies Successor liability concerns where assets are transferred Asset transfer issues – intangible assets, including intellectual property Transition issues – management, employees, business relationship, contract issues Escrow and post-closing issues   Speakers: Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware. Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/9/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: MAC Clauses in Business Transactions

$59.00

Material Adverse Change (MAC) clauses are common in most businesstransactions. These clauses allocate among the parties the risk of a MAC occurring between the execution of transactional documents and closing the underlying transaction.  Sellers want certainty that a sale or other transaction will close and argue that the MAC clause should be very narrowly drafted. Buyers want maximum flexibility and will argue that anything that makes the transaction unattractive should constitute a MAC.  Between those two opposing views are a host of narrow and technical but important details that need to be negotiated, details which will determine whether the transaction is successfully closed, efficiently and cost-effectively terminated, or devolves into dispute and litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide using and drafting MAC clauses in transactions.   Drafting “Material Adverse Change” provisions and carve-outs Forms of MACs – closing conditions or representations? Practical process of “proving” a MAC occurred, including burden of proof What happens to the transaction if a MAC occurred? Spotting red flags when drafting MAC clauses and best practices to reduce the risk   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/10/2021
    Presented
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Incentive Trusts: The Promise & Limits of “Do What I Want & I’ll Reward You”

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/14/2021
    Presented
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Retail Leases: Restructurings, Subleases, and Insolvency

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/15/2021
    Presented
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Offices Leases: Current Trends & Most Highly Negotiated Provisions

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/16/2021
    Presented
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The Ethics of Representing Two Parties in a Transaction

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/17/2021
    Presented
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