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2021 Wage & Hour Update: New Overtime Rules

$59.00

Wage and hour regulations impact every employer. Whether a worker is classified as an employee or independent contractor and employees as “exempt” or “non-exempt” for purposes of overtime has major implications for employer tax and non-tax compliance.  Failure to properly classify a worker can lead to substantial financial liability for employers and compliance has become more difficult as employers, following commercial trends, employee more “gig” workers or independent contractors.  Enforcement by the US Department of Labor and state equivalents is increasing.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to major developments in overtime rules and regulations and provide guidance on best practices to avoid liability.   Major case law and regulatory developments impacting overtime compliance Continuing classification litigation around “gig” economy workers Anticipated Biden Administration changes to overtime rules Changes to the “PAID” independent audit program Best practices to avoid misclassification liability   Speaker: Shira R. Yoshor is shareholder in the Houston office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where her practice focuses on labor and employment matters and a wide variety of complex commercial litigation. She is experienced in representing management in virtually all aspects of labor and employment law. She regularly counsels employers on managing workplace issues, drafts employment agreements, handbooks and policies, drafts and litigates non-competition and non-disclosure agreements, and investigates claims and complaints by employees. Shira has defended individual and multi-party claims before courts and arbitrators around the country.  Ms. Yoshor received her B.A., summa cum laude, from Yeshiva University and her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/26/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Text Messages & Litigation: Discovery and Evidentiary Issues

$59.00

Text messaging is main stream. Clients generate virtual reams of data when they message with business partners, vendors, employees, and even public. This is a rich vein of electronically stored information that is potentially discoverable in formal litigation or pre-litigation.  Because texting is so convenient, casual and almost reflexive, the caution clients exercise in other forms of communication are often disregarded when texting, including when they text with their lawyers. This program will provide you with a practical guide to obtaining text messages, the risks of discovery in litigation, and related issues. Obtaining text messages – working with mobile carriers Timing – how long are texts kept and in what form? Discovery issues – obtaining texts from parties or other sources Issues related to encrypted messaging services How strategies differ for plaintiffs and defendants   Speaker: Stanley E. Woodward Jr. is a partner in the law firm Brand Woodward Law, where he has a broad civil litigation and white-collar criminal defense practice.  He also conducts internal corporate investigations.  He serves as an adjunct professor of law at Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law, where he teaches pre-trial litigation and employment law. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Vanessa Ruiz of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and Judges Joan Zeldon and Judge Rufus King III of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.  Mr. Woodward earned his B.A., cum laude, and his M.S., magna cum laude, from American University, and his J.D., cum laude, from The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/22/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Choice of Entity for Service Businesses

$59.00

Familiar tradeoffs in choice of entity for businesses selling goods are scrambled when it comes to service-based businesses. This is particularly true with regard to tax law and the relatively new deduction for certain types of income in pass-through businesses. Choice of entity for service businesses also differ in consideration of distributions and employment taxes, incentive compensation and vesting of restricted ownership interests, and the eventual sale, liquidation or accession of new owners.  This program will provide you with practical guide to choice of entity for service businesses with special emphasis on the new tax law.   How the new deductions for pass-through income applies to service businesses What income and types of businesses are covered or not Regulatory, industry, finance and other non-tax considerations for service businesses Using multiple entities to achieve variable ownership, management and tax goals Converting entities if a prior choice of entity is no longer sound   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/23/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$59.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law.   Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/26/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 2

$59.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law.   Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/27/2021
    Presented
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Lawyer Ethics and Investigations for and of Clients

$59.00

Investigations by lawyers are an essential element of most litigation.  Lawyers investigate the parties and the facts underlying the case through the use of third-party investigators, online searches, obtaining public records, seeking the production of electronic communications, including text messages, and much more.  Also, lawyers sometimes need to investigate their own clients – to assure themselves of the veracity of certain representations or when the lawyer suspects the client may be actively misleading the lawyer.  These investigations are not without risk. Ethics rules limit what lawyers can do and say, and how the work product of these investigations may be used.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to ethical issues when lawyers conduct investigations.   Duty of an attorney to investigate a case before filing a lawsuit “Pre-texting” – the ethics of deception  in investigations Ethical issues when a lawyer investigates a client – and when it is ethically required Conflicts of interest in investigations Ethical issues in social media and online searches – and obtaining text messages Use of third-party investigators Limitations on investigating members of a jury or jury pool When investigations go awry – discipline, sanctions, exclusion of evidence obtained   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/28/2021
    Presented
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Drafting Indemnity Agreements in Business and Commercial Transactions

$59.00

  Indemnity agreements are central to the risk allocation and limitation of liability system built into most transactionalarrangements. The indemnitor agrees to indemnify the indemnitee on the occurrence of certain events. The scope of liability in these agreements is very carefully defined, often including actual costs but excluding consequential damages or any damages arising from third-party claims. All of the pieces of the indemnity puzzle – scope, measure of damages, exclusions and procedures for cost recovery – must be very carefully considered, negotiated and drafted. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting key provisions of indemnity agreements in transactional agreements.    Scope of indemnity – indemnity v. hold harmless, damages v. liabilities, direct v. third-party claims Types of losses subject to indemnity – breaches of reps and warranties, covenants, losses, specific circumstances Determining recoverable damages and costs, including attorneys’ fees Implied or equitable indemnity – and use of disclaimers to limit liability Difference between the duty to defend v. indemnification  Procedure for claiming and obtaining indemnification reimbursements   Speakers: Joel R. Buckberg is a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, P.C. and chair of the firm’s commercial transactions and business consulting group. He has more than 45 years’ experience structuring and drafting commercial, corporate and business transactions.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly Law Partners, LLC, and has more than 30 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/29/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics and Email

$59.00

This program will provide you with a practical guide to developments under the Family and Medical Leave Act and review trends in employee leave generally. The program will cover significant case law and regulatory developments, as well as the practical trends in dispute and litigation impacting your employer clients. The program will cover the impact of technology, contract employees, and other changes in the workforce, and discuss their impact on traditional leave law.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to significant legal and practical developments under FMLA and employee leave generally. Case law and regulatory developments under the FMLA Developments related to “appropriate notice” Serious health condition requiring leave and practical application Remote and work-from-home workers and leave under the FMLA Responding to leave requests based on substance abuse Emerging cannabis issues   Speaker: Patrick F. Martin is a partner in the Miami office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a national employment law practice. He represents employers of all sizes before state and federal courts, as well as administrative agencies such as the Department of Labor, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Florida Commission on Human Relations. He regularly litigates cases involving wrongful termination, employment discrimination, workplace harassment, public accommodation, wage and hour matters, and employee disability and leave issues. He also advises employers on preventive strategies to minimize potential litigation and assists in the development of policies to promote constructive employee relations. Mr. Martin earned his B.A. from the University of Virginia and his J.D. from Florida State University College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 4/30/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Selection and Preparation of Expert Witnesses in Litigation

$59.00

Experts play a vitally important role in civil litigation, whether they act as consulting experts or also as testifying experts.  The complexity of modern litigation has substantially increased the pressure on attorneys to carefully evaluate the suitability of experts for a particular case and prepare them for testimony. Approaching, evaluating and preparing witnesses, however, is as much an art as science or database search.  Furthermore, once an expert is selected, there are substantial risks surrounding discovery and preserving the attorney-client privilege.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to selecting and preparing experts in civil litigation. How to find the right expert witness and common traps Evaluating the suitability of experts for your case Consulting v. testifying experts Approaching and retaining experts Preparing witnesses for testimony in a specific case Practical tips on the best/worst uses of particular types of expertise in litigation Discovery issues and preserving the attorney-client privilege   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/3/2021
    Presented
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MAC Clauses in Business Transactions

$59.00

Material Adverse Change (MAC) clauses are common in most businesstransactions. These clauses allocate among the parties the risk of a MAC occurring between the execution of transactional documents and closing the underlying transaction.  Sellers want certainty that a sale or other transaction will close and argue that the MAC clause should be very narrowly drafted. Buyers want maximum flexibility and will argue that anything that makes the transaction unattractive should constitute a MAC.  Between those two opposing views are a host of narrow and technical but important details that need to be negotiated, details which will determine whether the transaction is successfully closed, efficiently and cost-effectively terminated, or devolves into dispute and litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide using and drafting MAC clauses in transactions.   Drafting “Material Adverse Change” provisions and carve-outs Forms of MACs – closing conditions or representations? Practical process of “proving” a MAC occurred, including burden of proof What happens to the transaction if a MAC occurred? Spotting red flags when drafting MAC clauses and best practices to reduce the risk   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/4/2021
    Presented
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The Law of Background Checks: What Clients May/May Not ‘Check

$59.00

Background checks are an exercise in risk management in hiring. Employers want to align an applicant’s skills with a job profile, reducing the likelihood the hire will not work out or, worse yet, cause the employer liability. This typically means that the employer wants as much information as possible on job candidates. But background checks themselves are fraught with potential liability. There are many categories of questions that employers may not ask applicants; and if they do ask these questions, they open themselves to liability.This program will provide you with a real-world guide to what is allowed and what isnot allowed in background checks, and best practices for using that information and avoiding liability.   Framework of laws impacting background checks, including the Fair Credit Reporting Act What an employ may/may not ask – criminal arrest history, marital status, age, credit history, and other bases Social media background checks Liability for improper/discriminatory use of background checks Counseling clients about best practices in conducting/using background checks   Speaker: Felicia Davis is an attorney in the Los Angeles office of Paul Hastings, LLP where she represents employers in all aspects of labor and employment law, including discrimination, retaliation, harassment, religious accommodation and wage and hour issues, in both single-plaintiff and class-action matters. She has also represented clients in disability access litigation under Title III. She has served as lead attorney on single and multi-plaintiff matters, successfully defending lawsuits alleging discrimination, retaliation, and wrongful discharge as well as collective bargaining agreement violations. She is a member of the ABA Labor and Employment Law Committee on Technology in the Practice and Workplace (Planning Committee). Ms. Davis received her B.A., cum laude, from Claremont McKenna College and her J.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/5/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2020 Ethics in Litigation Update, Part 1

$59.00

This annual ethics update will cover a wide range of ethical developments important to your civil litigation practice.  The program will provide detailed coverage of developments in conflicts of interest in litigation, confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege, and ethics in defense and common interest agreements.  The program will provide a wide ranging discussion of the ethical issues that arise with the spread, use and development of technology in litigation.  Also, the panel will discuss ethical issues in discovery of digital files, records, and communications.  Please join for this annual program which will provide you with a lively discussion of ethical developments important to civil litigation practice.  Day 1: Emerging issues in ethics and discovery Working with and preparing witnesses – the limits of coaching Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Annual technology review – the many ways in which technology can cause ethical traps for lawyers in litigation Current developments in client confidentiality, the attorney-client privilege, and work product doctrine Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  He is the immediate past Treasurer of the ABA and currently serves as Vice President of the Tennessee Bar Association.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/6/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2020 Ethics in Litigation Update, Part 2

$59.00

This annual ethics update will cover a wide range of ethical developments important to your civil litigation practice.  The program will provide detailed coverage of developments in conflicts of interest in litigation, confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege, and ethics in defense and common interest agreements.  The program will provide a wide ranging discussion of the ethical issues that arise with the spread, use and development of technology in litigation.  Also, the panel will discuss ethical issues in discovery of digital files, records, and communications.  Please join for this annual program which will provide you with a lively discussion of ethical developments important to civil litigation practice.  Day 1: Emerging issues in ethics and discovery Working with and preparing witnesses – the limits of coaching Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Annual technology review – the many ways in which technology can cause ethical traps for lawyers in litigation Current developments in client confidentiality, the attorney-client privilege, and work product doctrine Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  He is the immediate past Treasurer of the ABA and currently serves as Vice President of the Tennessee Bar Association.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.   William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/7/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Baskets and Escrow in Business Transactions

$59.00

Identifying and hedging the risk of the unknown is one of the biggest risks in business documentation.  If unknown liabilities arise – or known liabilities are greater than anticipated –parties want recourse to address the economic loss.  “Caps” and “baskets” are used to address this problem.  Caps are the the total amount for which one party may be liable to the other party post-closing. “Baskets” are the amount of loss one party must incur, if any, before seeking recourse to the other party. The variations and interplay between caps and baskets can be highly complex. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the uses, types, and drafting traps of caps and baskets in business transactions. Types of “baskets” – “tipping baskets” v. “true deductibles” v. hybrids Negotiating “caps” – aggregates limits, specific carve-outs for fraud and other bad acts Intricate relationship between baskets and caps Drafting to reduce risk of dispute and enhance collectability of claims Use of escrow to ensure payment of indemnification claims   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/10/2021
    Presented
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Trust and Estate Planning for Single Clients

$59.00

It’s a misnomer to think that single clients, unmarried and without children, don’t need estate planning.  In some important ways, they need planning more urgently than clients who are married.  Single clients need to plan for long-term health and medical decision making, if they do not have close relatives.  They need to plan for their long-term care and to maximize the benefit of retirement accounts. They also need to grapple with what to do with any assets they may have at their death.  Single clients often do not think about these issues and need to be counseled about alternatives.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to counseling and planning issues for unmarried clients.    Retirement account assets, life insurance policies, and beneficiary designations Advance medical directives, health care powers of attorney, and living wills Counseling clients about charitable giving to develop their interests/passions Choosing personal representatives when the client does not have close family   Speakers:  Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/11/2021
    Presented
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Drafting Demand Letters

$59.00

Demand letters may seem like they’re merely hammer-strokes, the first blow of litigation.  But the most effective demand letters are more subtly crafted.  Tone is important.  Vitriolic letters – letters that do not keep a client’s goals in mind and misjudge the reader’s range of likely reactions – may be counterproductive.  Rather than moving the process toward a good outcome, the letter may actually result in setbacks and greater costs.  There’s a subtle balance between precision and vagueness, stimulating favorable response by being sufficiently vague so that the reader speculates about adverse consequences.There’s also the issue of how much of your case – favorable facts and persuasive law – to include in the letter.This program will provide you with a real-world guide to setting goals and carefully crafted demand letters to advance client goals.   Setting goals and realistic expectations Striking the right tone – how aggressive is too aggressive? Precision v. vagueness - leaving room for speculation and negotiation How much of your case – the facts and the law – to include in the letter? Common traps and mistakes in demand letters   Speaker:  Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/12/2021
    Presented
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From One Thing to Another: Business Entity Conversions & Domestication

$59.00

Choice of entity is not a one-time decision.  Business entities may choose to change their legal form for many reasons – changing tax laws, new investors that require a different form of entity, or market or regulatory conditions making a different form of entity the better choice. But whenever an entity is converted from one form to another, significant tax liability and corporate or partnership law issues arise.  One important consideration is how to modify the company’s underlying agreements to ensure basic economic arrangements among the owners remain intact.  This program will provide a real-world guide to entity conversions.   Conversions among C Corps, S Corps, partnerships and LLCs Strategies for minimizing tax on conversions Business and organizational law considerations when converting an entity Drafting issues in restating underlying company agreements Practical and tax traps when engaging in an entity conversion   Speaker: Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/13/2021
    Presented
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2021 Fiduciary Litigation Update

$59.00

This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of developments in fiduciary litigation. Challenges to the validity of an estate, claims involving non-probate transfers, and trustee liability cases litigation will be covered. The program will also cover claims based on a fiduciary’s management of assets in a time of extreme volatility and crisis. This program will provide you with a practical guide to recent developments in fiduciary litigation.    Review of significant case law developments and trends in fiduciary litigation Challenges to validity of an estate Claims involving non-probate transfers Trustee liability cases Failure to diversify trust assets in a time of volatility and crisis Claims based on distribution polices or abuse of discretionary distributions   Speaker: Steven B. Malech is partner in the New York City office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where he is chair of the firm’s probate litigation practice group.  He is represents beneficiaries, fiduciaries and creditors in disputes involving alleged violations of the Prudent Investor Act and its predecessors, alleged breaches of fiduciary duty, disputed accountings, and will contests. He represents clients in cutting edge probate litigation matters involving trusts and estates with assets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Malech received his B.A., with special honors, from the University of Texas and his J.D. from the Connecticut School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/14/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Earnouts: Taking a Wait and See Approach to Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$59.00

The most highly negotiated provision of most transactions is price. Sellers want to maximize the value of the deal, putting the most optimistic spin historical and forward-looking projections.  Sellers take a more skeptical view, questioning the sustainability of growth and the accuracy of forecasts.  When differences over valuation cannotbe bridged, the parties may use an earnout, which allows them to both take a wait-and-see approach and still close the transaction. Earnouts generally involve a current payment from buyer to seller together with ongoing payments to the seller if the company performs as the seller projected.  But there are many drafting and operational traps when using earnouts.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to structuring and drafting earnouts to later disputes and litigation. Most highly negotiated and litigated provisions in earnout agreements Post-closing operations – control by buyer, but informational access to seller Defining key metrics – objective, measurable and potential traps Relationship of earnouts to senior debt and other preferential returns Debt issues and how it impacts financial results – and post-closing payments How earnouts are different than escrow and holdbacks   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/17/2021
    Presented
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2021 Trust and Estate Planning Update

$59.00

This annual program will provide you with a wide-ranging on important developments impacting your estate and trust planning practice. The program will provide a discussion of recent case law, regulatory developments and IRS rulings related to beneficiary creditor protections, basis planning, qualified small business stock, deductions for pass-through income, limits on state taxation of non-grantor trusts, and much more. The program will discuss the changing dynamic of trust and estate planning practice.  This annual program will provide you with a practical review of developments impacting your trust and estate planning practice.   Impact of recent tax law on trust and estate planning Review of significant letter rulings, case law, and regulatory developments Fiduciary litigation trends Review of legislative proposals, including impact of election   Speakers: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law. Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/18/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Subtenants in Commercial Leasing: How to Protect Your Client

$59.00

Subleases are by their very nature filled with substantial risk.  A sub-tenant agrees to take space – office, retail, or industrial – from a sub-landlord, pay the sub-landlord rent, and perform certain services. But without between the sub-tenant and the senior landlord, the sub-tenant has no rights to assert against the senior landlord even though the sub-tenant’s use of the space may depend on the actions of the senior landlord.  This sub-tenant is also at substantial risk of losing the space if either the senior or sub-landlord goes bankrupt. The relationship of these parties is highly complex. This program will provide you with a practical guide protecting subtenants in leasing. Counseling sub-tenant clients about the range of risks in subleases How to read master leases to spot red flags for tenants Types of subleases – what works for bigger/smaller clients and spaces? Identifying master lease’s control of subleasing and sublease terms Master lease money provisions, use restrictions, attornment provisions, and termination Determining whether sublease risks outweigh the benefits   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/19/2021
    Presented
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Drafting Escrow Agreements in Business & Commercial Transactions

$59.00

Every escrow agreement has a degree of intrinsic uncertainty.  Whether the agreement is for the release of money, property title, software code, or something else, the escrow agent must determine whether certain conditions have been met before releasing the property held in escrow.  That involves a degree of judgement, and like all judgments, subject to dispute.  In this sense, escrow agreements, which are intended to limit risk and enhance the certainty of a transaction, introduce another layer of risk. This puts a priority on carefully drafting the material details of the underlying transaction in as clear terms as possible.This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting escrow agreements in transactions.   Defining conditions for release of property in basic, clear, explicit terms to reduce risk Drafting release instructions to tightly synchronize with the underlying transaction Inherent risks involved with escrow agent determinations Co-mingled and held in trust funds v. segregated funds Timing – how drafting too early might miss key terms in the underlying agreement Choosing the right escrow agent depending on the nature of the transaction Reducing escrow agent through E&O or other insurance   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/20/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: The Ethics of Bad Facts and Bad Law

$59.00

  Every representation involves “bad” facts and/or “bad” law – facts and law that run counter to a client’s objectives.  Ethical tensions and issues arise when a lawyer has todisclose bad facts or law to a court or administrative panel, or even to an adversary. At what point does the lawyer’s duty as a member of the bar and officer of the court require disclosure even when it is adverse to a client’s interest whom the lawyer must zealously represent?  What are the limits to how a lawyer may represent an adverse fact or adverse law, even unpublished law, to an adversary?  Answering these difficulty questions may not only impact the outcome of a representation but potentially expose ethical sanction.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the ethical issues surrounding bad facts and bad law in client representations. Lawyer ethical duties to disclose bad facts and bad law Ethical issues surrounding the representation of adverse facts to tribunals and adversaries Duties to disclose adverse legal precedent to courts and administrative panels When is a lawyer required to disclose bad fact or law versus when they may disclose? Timing issues – at what stage should adverse facts and law be disclosed? Related issues of confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Ex parte communications with the courts – what’s ethically permissible, what’s not?   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/21/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Due Diligence in Commercial Real Estate Transactions

$59.00

This program will provide you with a practical guide to due diligence in real estate transactions – what information you need, where to get it, and the timeframes involved.  The program will also cover the relationship between the duration and depth of due diligence depending on the state of themarket– i.e., how “hot” markets involve more risk because sellers or othersare reluctant to give lengthy diligence periods. The program will also discuss using information obtained in diligence to draft specific reps and warranties. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning due diligence in real estate transaction and how that information is used. Planning diligence – what information you need, where to get it, and timeframes Relationship between diligence and market conditions – willingness of sellers to cooperate or not Using diligence – tying information obtained to specific reps and warranties Review of leases, rent rolls, and financial statements Service contracts, condominium HOAs, and other contracts Title work – liens and other encumbrances   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/24/2021
    Presented
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Ethics of Shared Law Offices, Working Remotely & Virtual Offices

$59.00

Technology allows lawyers far more flexibility to practice law than ever before.  Lawyers can work in shared offices, splitting expenses with other small firms or solo practitioners. They can work remotely, from home or virtually anywhere, with basic computer and networking technology. But all these innovations come with ethics traps. These include issues of communications and confidentiality, supervising outsourced worked, multijurisdictional practice, and managing all the technology used to practice law from home.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to ethical issues when working from home or anywhere but a traditional office.   Disclosure to clients of virtual nature of law office Duty of competence as a duty to understand technology Electronic communications, confidentiality, and ethical risks in virtual law offices How Web sites and a “virtual” presence implicate multijurisdictional practice issues Outsourcing work to paralegal services, including fee sharing issues   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/25/2021
    Presented
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Talking About Wealth Transfer Plans: Practical Strategies to Avoid Disputes Among Beneficiaries

$59.00

Transferring wealth often unearths long-deferred issues that may complicate or even subvert the best laid trust and estate plans. Heirs may have expectations about their inheritance that are unrealistic. Certain children may expect to take control of a family business. There are often interpersonal resentments or animosities among children of different marriages. Sometimes, too, there are children from a relationship that was previously unknown.  These and many other issues need to be explored before plans are formulated and documents drafted.  But raising these issues is a very delicate conversation which sometimes takes lawyers to the edge of their comfort zone. This program will provide you a practical guide to raising these issues and counseling clients about the legal issues involved.    Communicating wealth transfer plans before the death of a client When to have those conversations – timing is everything How to broach uncomfortable topics and pose unpopular choices Anticipating visceral reactions and strategies to avoid estrangement and dispute How trustee choices may impact beneficiary reactions   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/26/2021
    Presented
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Ethical Issues in Contract Drafting

$59.00

  Negotiating, drafting and reviewing contracts are processes fraught with ethical issues.  Negotiations sometimes require zealous advocacy, taking maximal positions; other times, they require delicacy and balance. Reviewing and drafting complex contracts is a similar ethical minefield. If you discover that the draft of a contract contains materially incorrect assumptions about the law but which will benefit your client, do you have the duty to disclose or correct the error?  In the same way, if the contract contains faulty assumptions about material facts, must you disclose those faulty assumptions?  And how do these rules apply when drafting a contract?  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the ethics of negotiating, drafting and reviewing contracts.   The law – when you know a counterparty has made faulty assumptions benefiting your client, must you say? The facts – when a counterparty makes faulty factual assumptions, must you correct? Ethics and rescission – are you ever ethically obligated to rescind or restate a contract? Ethics in negotiations – what’s the line between zealous representation and deception?    Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/27/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics and Disputes with Clients

$59.00

Ethical tensions are perhaps never as great as when a lawyer is in dispute with a client. The dispute may arise over fees, communication, perceived conflicts of interest, or something else.  In these and other circumstances, the lawyer’s duties of loyalty, zealous representation and confidentiality are all brought into direct conflict with the lawyer’s interest in self-defense. In these extremely delicate circumstances, the lawyer must determine what information may disclosed in his or her self-defense, its impact on the attorney-client privilege, and what steps he or she can take to de-escalate the conflict.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the ethical issues for a lawyer when he or she is in conflict with a client. Disputes involving lawyers’ fees, communications, unfavorable result of representation, conflicts of interest, malpractice claims Confidentiality and self-defense – what disclosure of confidences is permissible?   Waivers and engagement letters to prevent dispute – or mitigate their damage Permissible and mandatory withdrawals from a representation Special attorney-client privilege issues in these disputes   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, her practice focused on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Rules of Professional Conduct Rules Review Committee.  She is the immediate past chair of the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/28/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Family Businesses, Part 1

$59.00

Most successful businesses are owned by one or more families.  Because they are family owned, these companies create many special planning challenges.  Ownership and control do not shift among non-owner managers or anonymous shareholders. Rather, succession in ownership and management is a momentous and often highly emotional process for members of the family.  Frequently, these transitions are caused by the retirement or death of members of a family member.  And these transitions, if not carefully planned and delicately handled, can be ruinous, damaging the family and their company.  This program will provide you a practical framework of trust and estate planning and succession planning for family businesses.  Day 1: Framework of trust and estate planning tools and techniques for family businesses Valuation issues for financial and tax purposes Buy-sell planning with family members or key employees Selling to third parties where intra-family succession is not possible Planning for the incapacity of the founding generation Role of outside managers to overcome family drama related to control   Day 2: Counseling clients on how to avoid family drama on succession Life insurance trust planning – or as a compensating asset to certain heirs Structuring private annuities to transfer a business and provide income to founders Self-cancelling installments notes and intentionally defective irrevocable trusts Use of GRATS and “redemptive freezes”   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/1/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Family Businesses, Part 2

$59.00

Most successful businesses are owned by one or more families.  Because they are family owned, these companies create many special planning challenges.  Ownership and control do not shift among non-owner managers or anonymous shareholders. Rather, succession in ownership and management is a momentous and often highly emotional process for members of the family.  Frequently, these transitions are caused by the retirement or death of members of a family member.  And these transitions, if not carefully planned and delicately handled, can be ruinous, damaging the family and their company.  This program will provide you a practical framework of trust and estate planning and succession planning for family businesses.  Day 1: Framework of trust and estate planning tools and techniques for family businesses Valuation issues for financial and tax purposes Buy-sell planning with family members or key employees Selling to third parties where intra-family succession is not possible Planning for the incapacity of the founding generation Role of outside managers to overcome family drama related to control   Day 2: Counseling clients on how to avoid family drama on succession Life insurance trust planning – or as a compensating asset to certain heirs Structuring private annuities to transfer a business and provide income to founders Self-cancelling installments notes and intentionally defective irrevocable trusts Use of GRATS and “redemptive freezes”   Speakers:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/2/2021
    Presented
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