Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 1

$59.00

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses. Day 1: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLC and has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.   Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics. 

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/1/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 2

$59.00

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses. Day 1: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLC and has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.   Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.     

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/2/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: The Law of Consignments: How Selling Goods for Others Works

$59.00

In a consignment, the consignor, ships or transfers control of goods to a seller, the consignee, who agrees to market the property to buyers and pay over some portion of the sales proceeds to the consignor. The arrangement involves an intricate set of rights and obligations among the parties. There are also substantial and often overlooked risks, including that the consignee’s creditors may seek to claim a security interest in the consigned property.  If these risks are not properly understood and remedies not carefully considered, the consignor is at risk of loss. This program will provide you to the law of consignments, UCC Article 9 issues and risks, and provide practical tips for drafting consignment agreements.   Structure of common consignment transactions Parties, rights and obligations – consignor as creditor, consignee as debtor, creditors Risks of loss to consignor and how it can protect itself against consignee’s creditors Consignor remedies for consignee breach Law of consignments and relationship to secured finance Circumstances when UCC Article 9 does not apply to consignments   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/6/2024
    Presented
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Closely Held Stock Options, Restricted Stock, Etc.

$59.00

Equity-based compensation is often essential to recruiting and retaining key employees in closely held companies.  Whether through the use of stock options, restricted stock, appreciation rights or other instruments and techniques, incentive compensation aligns the financial interests of key employees with the entity. Incentive compensation also often has the benefit of not requiring the immediately outlay of cash. Depending on the instruments used, equity-based compensation may also help defer tax recognition.  Compensation in LLCs takes on different forms but functions similarly. This program will provide you with a practical guide to equity-based incentive compensation in closely held companies.   C and S Corp incentive compensation v. pass-through entity incentive compensation Eligibility for tax-favored Incentive Stock Options v. non-qualified stock options Use of restricted stock – valuation, vesting, and treatment Appreciation rights in corporate and pass-through entities Common structuring and drafting traps Tax treatment, advantages and disadvantages of incentive compensation   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/7/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

$59.00

Many companies lease rather than buy computers and servers, company cars and other capital equipment.  These leases are government by UCC Article 2A, an intricate set of provisions governing their validity, treatment, and enforcement.  If the lease is not properly drafted to comply with the UCC, it risks being re-characterized as a sale or a security interest, which give rise to substantially adverse financial and tax consequences. This program will also provide you with a practical guide to reviewing equipment leases, including spotting red flags and avoiding recharacterization.   Types of equipment leases – “true” leases, synthetic leases, “lease to own” arrangements, and more Spotting red flags of financeable leases – and how to ensure UCC 2A compliance Rights and obligations of the parties – manufacturer, lessor and lessee – and remedies for breach Circumstances leading to re-characterization of a “true lease” as a sale or financing Adverse financial, tax and practical ramifications of lease re-characterization Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/13/2024
    Presented
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Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 1

$59.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 14, 2024: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 15, 2024: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/14/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 2

$59.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 14, 2024: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 15, 2024: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/15/2024
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$59.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/26/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$59.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/27/2024
    Presented
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Reps and Warranties in Business Transactions

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/4/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Ethics for Business Lawyers

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/12/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/25/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/26/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Director and Officer Liability: What are the Tripwires

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/30/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 1

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/2/2024
    Presented
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Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 2

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/3/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 1

$59.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/15/2024
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 2

$59.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/16/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Fundamentals of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$59.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies. Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/17/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Fundamentals of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$59.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies. Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/18/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Earnouts: Taking a Wait and See Approach to Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/21/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 1

$59.00

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.    Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights   Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Christopher Davidson is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where he advises clients on a wide variety of federal and tax matters, including in the areas of corporate formations, financings, and transactions.  His focus is on foreign and domestic tax matters for partnerships, LLCs, and corporations. He is a frequent contributor to professional tax journals. Mr. Davidson received his B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Maryland, his J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law, and his LL.M. from New York University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/4/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 2

$59.00

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.    Day 1:  Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights   Day 2:  Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Christopher Davidson is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where he advises clients on a wide variety of federal and tax matters, including in the areas of corporate formations, financings, and transactions.  His focus is on foreign and domestic tax matters for partnerships, LLCs, and corporations. He is a frequent contributor to professional tax journals. Mr. Davidson received his B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Maryland, his J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law, and his LL.M. from New York University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/5/2024
    Presented
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Course1

When Business Partners Want Out: Business Divorce, Part 1

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/7/2024
    Presented
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Course1

When Business Partners Want Out: Business Divorce, Part 2

$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/8/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: "Boilplate" Provisions in Business and Commercial Contracts: Traps for the Unwary

$59.00

The “back of the book” provisions of common business, commercial and real estate agreements are often labeled “boilerplate,” copied and pasted from earlier agreements. But when disputes arise, these overlooked provisions – related to damages, choice of law and forum, notice, integration, and amendments – can determine the fate transaction. These provisions, if not closely examined in the context of every agreement, can provide grounds for litigation – or threats of litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting essential “boilerplate” provisions with an emphasis on reducing risk.   Damages – types, limitations, drafting traps Choice of law/choice of forum – what the law allows v. what parties prefer Amendments – forms of written amendments, email, and course of dealing Notice – adapting methods to digital communication, traps Integration – conversations, extraneous writings, and assumptions Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/18/2024
    Presented
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Course1

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$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/21/2024
    Presented
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Course1

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$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/2/2024
    Presented
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Course1

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$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/6/2024
    Presented
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Course1

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$59.00

To Be Determined

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/12/2024
    Presented
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