Course1

Planning with S Corps, Part 2

$59.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speaker:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/18/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Planning with S Corps, Part 1

$59.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speaker:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/17/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Business Divorce, Part 2

$59.00

Business divorce can be as complicated, costly and dramatic as traditional divorce. When owners of a closely-held company decide they cannot or will not work together anymore, there are several alternatives for achieving the separation – a division of assets among the owners, a buyout of one owner or several owners by a third party or by the company itself, or a complete or partial sale of the company.  But these and other transactional forms come with risk – the risk that dividing the assets of an operating business will cause substantial destruction of value to the company or that strife will take its toll on operations and employees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the alternatives for achieving a business divorce, planning the process, containing the risk and preserving value. Day 1: Overview of techniques to accomplish a divorce – buy-sell arrangements, redemptions, compensation, employment separation and retirement plan techniques Special considerations when the divorce involves LLCs, S Corps or partnerships Valuation methods and disputes in a business divorce Techniques for financing a buyout as part of a business divorce Minimizing adverse tax consequences in a business divorce   Day 2: Compensation and retirement plan-based techniques for accomplishing a business divorce Special issues when a business divorce involves a distressed business Role of confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation agreements as part of the divorce Important intellectual property issues, including customer lists, goodwill and trade secrets Preservation of valuable tax attributes   Speakers:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/2/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Business Divorce, Part 1

$59.00

  Business divorce can be as complicated, costly and dramatic as traditional divorce. When owners of a closely-held company decide they cannot or will not work together anymore, there are several alternatives for achieving the separation – a division of assets among the owners, a buyout of one owner or several owners by a third party or by the company itself, or a complete or partial sale of the company.  But these and other transactional forms come with risk – the risk that dividing the assets of an operating business will cause substantial destruction of value to the company or that strife will take its toll on operations and employees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the alternatives for achieving a business divorce, planning the process, containing the risk and preserving value. Day 1: Overview of techniques to accomplish a divorce – buy-sell arrangements, redemptions, compensation, employment separation and retirement plan techniques Special considerations when the divorce involves LLCs, S Corps or partnerships Valuation methods and disputes in a business divorce Techniques for financing a buyout as part of a business divorce Minimizing adverse tax consequences in a business divorce   Day 2: Compensation and retirement plan-based techniques for accomplishing a business divorce Special issues when a business divorce involves a distressed business Role of confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation agreements as part of the divorce Important intellectual property issues, including customer lists, goodwill and trade secrets Preservation of valuable tax attributes   Speakers:    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/1/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Business Lawyers

$59.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.  Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/30/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Supply Agreements

$59.00

Supply contracts are the backbone of many businesses, providing the buying with essential goods for a production process or finished product inventory for sale.  In the supply chains these agreements create, time is of the essence.  Buyers rely on timely delivery of quality raw material or inventory.  Production and sales are often finely calibrated for just in time delivery.  In addition, there area wide range of liability issues involved in these agreements because any disruption of the supply chain can cause substantial losses.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to reviewing the most important provisions of supply agreements for clients.  Drafting and negotiating most essential terms of supply agreements Issues for both suppliers and buyers in different industries Framework of law governing supply issue, including UCC warranty and title issues Product quality, volume commitments, delivery, and more Identifying, allocating, and mitigating risk – indemnity and insurance Spotting red flags in “form” supply agreements   Speaker:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/18/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: "Boilplate" Provisions in Contracts: Overlooked Traps in Every Agreement

$59.00

The “back of the book” provisions of common business, commercial and real estate agreements are often labeled “boilerplate,” copied and pasted from earlier agreements. But when disputes arise, these overlooked provisions – related to damages, choice of law and forum, notice, integration, and amendments – can determine the fate transaction. These provisions, if not closely examined in the context of every agreement, can provide grounds for litigation – or threats of litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting essential “boilerplate” provisions with an emphasis on reducing risk. Damages – types, limitations, drafting traps Choice of law/choice of forum – what the law allows v. what parties prefer Amendments – forms of written amendments, email, and course of dealing Notice – adapting methods to digital communication, traps Integration – conversations, extraneous writings, and assumptions Speaker:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/9/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 2

$59.00

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.  Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights Special considerations for service-based businesses   Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property When the first choice wasn’t correct – considerations when an entity needs to convert Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations   Speaker:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/30/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 1

$59.00

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.  Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights Special considerations for service-based businesses   Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property When the first choice wasn’t correct – considerations when an entity needs to convert Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations   Speaker:

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/29/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 2

$59.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: James C. T. Linfield is a partner in the Broomfield, Colorado office of Cooley, LLP.  His practice focuses on representation of public and private technology companies and venture capital funds, with an emphasis on corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions and strategic alliances. He has deep experience advising start-ups, venture-backed companies, public entities and investors across a wide variety of industries, including biotechnology, medical devices.  Earlier in his career, he served as Chief Financial Officer and General Counsel of a biotechnology company.  He is a member of the board of directors of the Deming Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado.  Mr. Linfield earned his A.B., magna cum laude, from Harvard College and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/22/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$59.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: James C. T. Linfield is a partner in the Broomfield, Colorado office of Cooley, LLP.  His practice focuses on representation of public and private technology companies and venture capital funds, with an emphasis on corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions and strategic alliances. He has deep experience advising start-ups, venture-backed companies, public entities and investors across a wide variety of industries, including biotechnology, medical devices.  Earlier in his career, he served as Chief Financial Officer and General Counsel of a biotechnology company.  He is a member of the board of directors of the Deming Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado.  Mr. Linfield earned his A.B., magna cum laude, from Harvard College and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/21/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Liquidation: Legal Issues When a Client Decides to Close a Business

$59.00

Planning for an LLC’s eventual liquidation can be as important as formation. Well planned and efficient liquidations help LLC members preserve value. Messy liquidations are costly and rapidly diminish value. Whether triggered by a provision in a buy/sell agreement or on the basis of a statutory provision, liquidations are a process of marshaling assets, providing a variety of notices, satisfying debts and other liabilities, and eventually liquidating distributions to LLC members. When planned and managed effectively, the process can preserve substantial value for clients. This program will provide you with a practical guide to liquidations of LLCs. Statutory bases for voluntary LLC dissolution and how they are triggered by members Judicial/non-voluntary bases for LLC dissolution Planning for eventual dissolution of an LLC in buy/sell agreements Process of dissolution, winding up and termination – and practical consequences of each step Drafting statements of dissolution Summary of tax consequences of distributions of various type of property   Speaker:   Daniel G. Straga is counsel in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his and his B.A. from the University of Delaware and his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/20/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Classes of Stock: Structuring voting and non-voting

$59.00

Crafting a corporation’s capital structure to harmonize competing economic interests is among the most challenging aspects of corporate formation. Certain investors want preferred returns of capital and “protective” rights in the form of enhanced voting rights.  They also want a senior claim to the corporation’s assets on liquidation. But common stock is often the largest tranche of a corporation’s capital structure and its claims cannot be entirely truncated in preference of preferred stock.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting corporate common and preferred stock, with an emphasis on drafting preferred returns. Classes and series of sock in a closely held company’s capital structure Dividend rights – who gets what, when, and in preference to whom? Voting rights – preferential governance rights Liquidation rights – preferential claims on a company’s assets Conversion rights for preferred stock Dilution and impairment rights   Speaker: Tyler J. Sewell is n partner in the Denver office of Morrison & Foerster, LLP, where he specializes in mergers and acquisitions.  He focuses his practice on advising financial and strategic buyers and sellers in public and private M&A transactions and complex corporate transactions.  He negotiates and documents leveraged acquisitions, divestitures, asset acquisitions, stock acquisitions, mergers, auction transactions, and cross-border transactions. Mr. Sewell received his B.S., with merit, in ocean engineering from the United States Naval Academy and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/15/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$59.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/7/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$59.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/6/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Letters of Intent in Business Transactions

$59.00

Letters of intent frame the material terms of business and commercial transactions.  They outline with considerable detail the substantive terms of the underlying agreement – price, reps and warranties, closing conditions, etc. They also provide a process by which a definitive underlying agreement will be finalized. But they are not, generally, intended to be definitive agreements themselves; not enforceable, only a substantial starting point. There is, however, a certain point at which the detail in these letters becomes so extensive that they become enforceable.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the most important substantive and process aspects of letters of intent, their uses and traps, including unexpected enforceability. Drafting effective letters of intent in transactions Purposes of letters, timing, relationship to diligence, exclusivity Substantive  terms v. process terms Indemnity, hold back and limitation of liability provisions Termination of a letter and survival of certain provisions Understanding the point at which letters of intent may become enforceable   Speaker: Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/2/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Buying, Selling and Exchanging Partnership and LLC Interests

$59.00

As LLCs have become the default choice of entity for most businesses, sales and exchanges of LLC membership interests are commonplace. Despite the frequency of sales and exchanges, exactly what rights of the seller the buyer succeeds to is often mistaken and these mistakes can lead to dispute and litigation. By default, transferees succeed only to the economic interests of the transferor. They do not succeed to the transferor’s governance rights. If governance rights are part of the underlying bargain, the consent of the LLC’s other members generally must be sought.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting and planning for the sale and exchange of LLC interests. Selling/exchanging LLC and partnership interests and effective alternatives Succession to economic rights of seller v. management and information rights Tax consequences to the entity and buyers/sellers in sales/exchanges of entity interests Disguised sales of LLC/partnership interests – and techniques to avoid adverse tax impact Constructive terminations and their adverse tax consequences Distributions and other alternative to sales and exchanges of LLC/partnership interests   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/29/2020
    Presented
SEE MORE