Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 2

$59.00

Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1: Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2: Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/14/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 1

$59.00

  Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment.   Day 1: Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers   Day 2: Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker:  Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/13/2021
    Presented
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Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 2

$59.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/8/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 1

$59.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/7/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 2

$59.00

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses. Day 1: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLC and has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law. Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/2/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 1

$59.00

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses. Day 1: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLC and has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law. Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/1/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Sales Agreements: UCC Issues and More

$59.00

The sale of goods is one of the most common forms of commercial transactions.  The sales contracts governing these transactions can be quite complex and they must all comply with the Uniform Commercial Code Article 2.  The UCC governs contract formation, express and implied warranties, and outlines forms of breach of contract and types of remedies.  Compliance with the code enhances enforceability of the contract and expedites remedies upon breach.  However, when its many requirements are overlooked, contracts for sale of goods may be invalid and the underlying transaction void. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting and reviewing contracts for the sale of goods under UCC Article 2.     “Battle of forms,” methods of acceptance or rejection, and electronic contracting Delivery, acceptance or rejection of goods by buyer Breaches for failure to deliver, non-conforming product, repudiation, failure to pay Types and measure of damages for breach of contract by seller or buyer Express and implied warranties – fitness for purpose, merchantability, title infringement Disclaimer of warranties and other techniques to limit scope of liability   Speaker: Christopher Tompkins is a partner in the Chicago office of Jenner & Block, LLP, where he counsels clients in such areas as breach of contract, the Uniform Commercial Code, equipment leasing, business torts, and intellectual property.  He has handled all phases of litigation in state and federal court and before arbitration tribunals, including pre-litigation investigation, motion practice, discovery, working with expert witnesses, trial and appeal.Previously, he served as a legislative intern for the National Council of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws where he worked on legislation related to commercial law.  Mr. Tompkins received his B.A., cum laude, from The Catholic University of America and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/24/2021
    Presented
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Structuring Minority Ownership Stakes in Companies

$59.00

Taking a minority ownership stake in a closely held company is a common occurrence. An investor may have taken a minority stake to fund growth in the business or someone may have provided essential, non-cash services – technical expertise, sales skill, management expertise – in exchange for equity. But there are substantial drawbacks with minority stakes. The minority stake holder may have limited access to information to the business and little or no control or influence over the ultimate success of the business.  The majority stake holder(s) may also seek to force out minority stake holders. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to structuring minority stake investments in anticipation of the majority stake owner eventually forcing the buyout of minority stake owners. Structuring minority stake ownership for eventual buyout by the majority stake owner How to avoid undue dispute and litigation through planning Framework of law protecting minority stake owners Equitable structuring of minority stake governance, information, and other rights Differences between passive minority-stake owner and those who actively participate in the business Valuation and buyout finance issues for majority stake owners Liquidity rights for minority stake owners Counseling techniques to help avoid open dispute among owners Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/19/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$59.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speaker: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law.   Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/8/2021
    Presented
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Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$59.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/3/2021
    Presented
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Course1

Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$59.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/2/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with S Corps, Part 2

$59.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/22/2021
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Planning with S Corps, Part 1

$59.00

Despite the prevalence of LLCs, S Corps remain a preferred choice of entity for many family-controlled and other closely-held businesses.  They retain certain tax advantages over other pass-through entities and their corporate structure makes them familiar to investors, their legal counselors, and lenders. Still, S Corps are “fragile” entities in the sense that the tradeoff for their tax and other benefits is that they must adhere to a several capital structure restrictions, which limit their flexibility.  Drafting S Corp stockholders’ agreements is a careful balance of maximizing tax benefits, preventing the loss of the preferred tax status through inadvertently disqualifying corporate actions, and maximizing organizational flexibility in other areas. This program will provide you with a real world guide to business planning with S Corps and drafting their underlying stockholder agreements. Day 1: Business planning with S Corps and drafting S stockholders’ agreements Counseling clients on choice of entity considerations of S Corps v. LLCs/partnerships Capital structure issues – restrictions on types of debt and equity Who qualifies as an eligible  S Corp stockholder Transferability of interests and restrictions to preserve S Corp status   Day 2: Understanding tax benefits (and traps) of S Corps Distribution planning in S Corps – tax advantages/disadvantages of withdrawing money as salary or distributions Incentive compensation issues, including fringe benefits and restrictions on deductibility Planning for the merger or sale of an S Corp into another S Corp, LLC or C Corp   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/21/2021
    Presented
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Drafting Arbitration Agreements in Business and Commercial Transactions

$59.00

One of the biggest risks in most business, commercial, or real estate agreements is the risk of dispute and costly, protracted litigation. Arbitration agreements are one of the primary methods by which this substantial risk of loss is contained. Rather than the parties resorting to costly litigation, they are required to seek resolution of their dispute before a neutral arbiter, whose decision in the matter is final and cannot be litigated. Though these agreements are effective mechanisms for dispute resolution and cost containment, they are also highly controversial. This program will provide you with a practical guide the law governing arbitration agreements and drafting their major provisions.   Framework of law governing arbitration agreements Practical uses in business, commercial, and real estate transactions Circumstances where arbitration is effective v. ineffective Counseling clients about the benefits, risks, and tradeoffs of arbitration agreements Scope of arbitration, mandatory nature, and rules used Defining applicable law, arbiter selection, and method of arbitration Judgment on award, review by courts (if any), interim relief   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/20/2021
    Presented
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"Founding Documents": Drafting Articles of Incorporation & Bylaws, Part 2

$59.00

  Though LLCs have become a default choice of entity for many businesses, corporations – C Corps and S Corps – still produce optimal results for many family-held businesses or businesses operating in industries where the corporate is preferred or required.  The founding documents of corporations – Articles of Incorporation, Stockholders’ Agreements, and bylaws – are complex, interlocking instruments that create and regulate the capital structure, governance, and finance of the business.  Very important issues of who can own stock, how that stock is valued and transferred, how major corporate decisions are made, and how disputes are resolved are all determined by these documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting the essential founding documents of corporations.  Day 1: Practical planning and drafting founding documents Counseling clients about the allocation of voting power and distribution preferences Framework of law – what’s required, what can be modified, what’s discretionary Defining common stock characteristics – classes, voting rights Uses of preferred stock – classes, rights, preferences Tax issues to consider when drafting founding documents Day 2: Instituting boards of directors – duties, restrictions, indemnification Approval of shareholders – major transactions, voting thresholds, procedures Restrictions on the transferability of stock Major components of corporate bylaws Common traps in drafting founding documents – avoiding later litigation  Speaker:  Eric J. Zinn is of counsel in the Denver office of Kutak Rock, LLP.  He represents clients in clients in matters involving corporate, individual and partnership taxation, state and local taxation, and corporate mergers, acquisitions and finance. He is a frequent lecturer on topics including the proper choice of legal entity for the operation of a business enterprise, drafting operating agreements for limited liability companies, international taxation, partnership taxation, and like-kind exchanges.  He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado-Denver Business School and at the University of Colorado School of Law in Boulder. He is the author of "Colorado Limited Liability Company Forms and Practice Manual,” published by Data Trace Publishing. Before entering private practice he served as a judicial clerk to the U.S. Tax Court. Mr. Zinn earned his B.A. from the University of the South, J.D. and LL.M. in taxation from the University of Florida College of Law, and M.S. in finance, M.S. in information systems, and M.B.A. from the University of Colorado-Denver.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/6/2021
    Presented
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Course1

"Founding Documents": Drafting Articles of Incorporation & Bylaws, Part 1

$59.00

  Though LLCs have become a default choice of entity for many businesses, corporations – C Corps and S Corps – still produce optimal results for many family-held businesses or businesses operating in industries where the corporate is preferred or required.  The founding documents of corporations – Articles of Incorporation, Stockholders’ Agreements, and bylaws – are complex, interlocking instruments that create and regulate the capital structure, governance, and finance of the business.  Very important issues of who can own stock, how that stock is valued and transferred, how major corporate decisions are made, and how disputes are resolved are all determined by these documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting the essential founding documents of corporations.  Day 1: Practical planning and drafting founding documents Counseling clients about the allocation of voting power and distribution preferences Framework of law – what’s required, what can be modified, what’s discretionary Defining common stock characteristics – classes, voting rights Uses of preferred stock – classes, rights, preferences Tax issues to consider when drafting founding documents Day 2: Instituting boards of directors – duties, restrictions, indemnification Approval of shareholders – major transactions, voting thresholds, procedures Restrictions on the transferability of stock Major components of corporate bylaws Common traps in drafting founding documents – avoiding later litigation  Speaker:  Eric J. Zinn is of counsel in the Denver office of Kutak Rock, LLP.  He represents clients in clients in matters involving corporate, individual and partnership taxation, state and local taxation, and corporate mergers, acquisitions and finance. He is a frequent lecturer on topics including the proper choice of legal entity for the operation of a business enterprise, drafting operating agreements for limited liability companies, international taxation, partnership taxation, and like-kind exchanges.  He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado-Denver Business School and at the University of Colorado School of Law in Boulder. He is the author of "Colorado Limited Liability Company Forms and Practice Manual,” published by Data Trace Publishing. Before entering private practice he served as a judicial clerk to the U.S. Tax Court. Mr. Zinn earned his B.A. from the University of the South, J.D. and LL.M. in taxation from the University of Florida College of Law, and M.S. in finance, M.S. in information systems, and M.B.A. from the University of Colorado-Denver.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/5/2021
    Presented
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